Angelo Codevilla Addresses the Civil War

Codevilla is one of my favorite political writers going all the way back to the prehistory of the 2015 darkness.  I haven’t even finished reading this lengthy essay but I look forward to weighing his opinions against my own.  I’m sure it will be dark and pessimistic.  Good.  I need something to curb my unbridled enthusiasm.

Our Revolution’s Logic

The Trump Coalescence

An interesting thing about the Trump realignment is how the different factions of the Right interact with each other.  So just as an example, I know this guy who I would say is a blue-collar conservative.  He has never trusted the Republicans or the Democrats and he pretty much thinks the fix is in all the time.  So, he contrasts with my background.  I started out as a Reagan Republican and became disillusioned with the Republicans during the W years and embraced the Trumpocalypse in early 2016.  When we talk he comes from his default position of pessimism.  He’s afraid that it’s too late to vote our way out of the Leftist future and frets about the Mid-Terms.  When I speak to him about all this I tell him to start by relaxing a little bit because the Media is once again spinning the FUD to suppress voting by the Right so it’s definitely not going to be a Blue Wave.  Then he says that the future demographics will eventually tilt everything to the Left.  And I tell him that it’s time to start speaking up for what you want.  Just like Trump answered the call for forgotten Blue-Collar Democrats, another leader will be there in the future and a coalition can be formed that addresses the most important concerns of the Right at that time.  But the important thing to remember is that compromising to reach consensus is a lie being used to unilaterally pressure us into adopting the agenda that will disenfranchise us.

Fifteen years ago, I was struggling to understand how the Republicans could let the Left trample on the American way of life so effortlessly while my friend was unsurprised by their failure because he saw both parties as a conspiracy.  Whereas today he is unsure whether to become emotionally invested in the political scene and be disappointed in the outcome while I see events unfolding according to the plan of attack that President Trump is waging against the Left and the strategies he is using to rally the sclerotic forces on the establishment right.  It’s almost as if my disillusionment with the republicans forced me to delve deeper than those who never trusted them in the first place and never had to understand exactly how the system dysfunctioned (to coin a ridiculous term).

Another faction is those who didn’t trust Trump because they thought he was a joke or thought he was going to govern as a liberal.  Slowly but surely all of these folks have been coming around to at least a place where they admit that he is undoubtably doing a lot of good.  Even if they aren’t crazy about the man they are happy about the results.  And they are beginning to understand just how effective he is against their enemies.  These folks can help but they need to fight their learned reflex to compromise whenever a Leftist backs them into a corner (which is every time).  They need constant supervision.

And finally, we have the NeverTrumpers.  Despite their extreme hatred of Trump even these characters are starting to make noises like they’re ready to rejoin the flock.  And if the mid-terms go as well as they seem to be it won’t be long before they’ll be declaring themselves the real leaders of the Trump Revolution complete with New York Times best sellers, cruise ship seminars and proof that transgendered undocumented workers are the most important Trump constituency.  I think the main point that I’m trying to make is these characters should be compelled to embrace their choice and never join with Trump or anyone who stood with him.

So, the Trump Revolution moves apace and all that needs to be decided is the secret handshake, the setting of the decoder ring and how to keep the Bushes and Romneys from crashing the Christmas Party.  But seriously, you could have worse problems than how to on-board so many new recruits.

Universal Classic Monster Movies – An OCF Classic Movie Review – Part 5 – The Mummy

Re-posted from October 2017

So far in this review, I have gone over the “Big Three” of the Classic Monster class.  Dracula, Frankenstein and the Wolfman coexisted in a European setting even showing up in each other’ movies.  Very cozy.  Maybe almost too much of a good thing.  I mean after you have the Daughter of Dracula and the Bride and the Son of Frankenstein what’s left, the Wolfman’s Gardener’s Chiropractor?  It would almost be a relief to escape from foggy, chilly Central Europe and head for a warmer and dryer climate.

Egypt?

The Mummy presents an intersection of interesting subjects.  At the time, it was made (1932) less than 10 years had elapsed since the real-life discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb and the golden artifacts it contained.  This discovery along with the supposed “Tutankhamen’s Curse” upon all those who desecrated his tomb re-invigorated the public’s interest in Egyptology.  Add to that the fascination with a strange and exotic world such as the Middle East would have presented to Westerners of a century ago.  And finally mix this together with a mythical love story to produce a strange fantasy to lure the public with.  And the movie was very popular, even in Britain, where the colonial setting was probably of interest.

The story goes like this.  A British archeological dig in Egypt uncovers an unspoiled burial site that contains a mummy that was not embalmed but rather buried alive.  Markings on the tomb warn any grave robbers that the occupant is a cursed individual and anyone who reads the  Scroll of Thoth will perish and unleash an undead horror on the world.  So of course, they read the scroll.  This activates the long dead mummy of Imhotep, the priest who was punished for trying to use the Scroll of Thoth to revivify his lover  Anck-es-en-Amon, the princess whose untimely death brought about this whole tragedy.  After driving one of the expedition mad and sending him to an early grave, Imhotep (played by our old friend Boris Karloff) escapes with the scroll and disappears.  Ten years later Helen Grosvenor, the daughter of one of the surviving expedition members, is discovered by Imhotep to be the reincarnated spirit of Anck-es-en-Amon.  By this time Imhotep has assumed the identity of a modern-day Egyptian named Ardath Bey.  He plans to ritually slay Helen, mummify her and use the Scroll of Thoth to revivify her and make her his bride.  Pretty creepy.

Helen’s friends and family attempting to foil this plot are laughably ineffective.  At the end it takes Helen’s returned memory as Anck-es-en-Amon to appeal to Isis (whose votary she was) to put a stop to the ritual murder.  Imhotep is blasted by divine intervention and everyone (who is still alive at this point) lives happily ever after.

One interesting addition to the cast is our old friend Edward Van Sloan as Dr. Muller.  In this movie his effectiveness is somewhere between the high competency of Van Helsing in Dracula and the incredible incompetence of Dr. Waldman in Frankenstein.  Let’s give him a B- in the Mummy for at least putting up a fight.

I’ve always enjoyed the Mummy.  But I limit myself to one viewing every ten years.  Let’s face it.  A Mummy, even one with a scroll that bestows the power of life and death isn’t that scary.  For all it’s flaws the 1990s reboot with Brendan Fraser has a lot more chills in it with man eating scarab beetles and a Mummy that revivifies himself by stealing organs from the living.  But the 1930s version is solid entertainment well worth seeing, at least once.