My Early Christmas List to Santa Trump

Indulge me today in a little game.  I know that anything could happen after November 3rd up to and including the apocalypse.  But just for the sake of this post let’s assume that when the dust clears President Trump is clearly the winner of the election and the Republicans squeak out a win in the Senate and the House.  What would be my wish list for the coming four years of the second Trump administration.  Granted that this is the rosiest of scenarios but it is far from unlikely.  So, grant me the premise.

  • First and foremost, give Barr an ultimatum to either produce the reports of the investigations or resign. Either his staff has found crime committed by the Obama holdovers in the FBI and elsewhere or he has an explanation that covers all the outrages we have seen perpetrated over the last five years.  And regardless of whether Barr is the Attorney General or not it must be a priority to clear all the anti-Trump personnel out of the Justice Department.  Even if that depopulates the department it would be the smartest thing to do.  Reforming the FBI is an extremely important goal.  Defanging that agency would benefit everyone.  It is a weapon that can be brought to bear against any innocent American whenever political expediency calls for it.
  • Another priority is to punish those states that allowed Antifa and BLM to terrorize their citizens. What I would envision would be the feds initiating civil and criminal actions against the governors and mayors who were complicit in the protracted unrest that engulfed the lives of their citizens.  Testimony by all the individuals that feel they were harrowed and their lives disrupted and especially those that were assaulted or whose businesses were destroyed.  These are Americans who were treated like targets of a pogrom.  They were singled out based on the color of their skin.  The President should make it a point of pride to get them justice.  Those governors and mayors should be hounded out of office and prosecuted.
  • The President and Congress need to fully fund and swiftly build the Southern Wall. It is important and it is also a morale builder.  It shows the country that the government is taking their wishes seriously.  It’s what got President Trump elected in the first place.  It should not be forgotten.
  • The President needs to continue to appointing federal judges to all the circuit courts in the country as quickly as the openings occur. The power that a corrupt judiciary is able to wield is apparent from the outrageous actions of the federal judges who have hampered the President throughout his first term.  Eliminating the progressive majorities in the 9th Circuit Court and other progressive strongholds should be a priority for Republican presidents whenever the Senate is in their control.
  • The President needs to install an Attorney General who will employ the RICO statute to defund, prosecute and imprison the leadership and all guilty members of Antifa and BLM. The RICO laws were put in place to demolish the mafia.  Antifa and BLM are criminal organizations that have done incalculable harm in this country.  They need to be crushed.
  • The President needs to punish China for COVID and he needs to end the special relationship that has allowed China to monopolize American commerce for decades. China is at best an adversary.  In a lot of ways, it is our mortal enemy.  It needs to be treated as such.  And any American citizens or corporate entities that conspire with China to our detriment need to be severely punished.
  • And finally, I want him to fire Anthony Fauci. That dope has botched this COVID thing like no one could imagine.  I wouldn’t trust him to run a CVS Drug Store never mind the nation’s health.  He really is a dope.

 

Well that’s enough for this Christmas.  Of course, my first present has to happen way in advance of Christmas just to make the other presents possible.  I want a resounding election victory for the President.  So if that isn’t too much to ask, let’s start there.

Minneapolis Seems To Be Having a Slight Crime Problem

After allowing a mob to burn down police headquarters, voting to defund their police department and vilifying police officers as racists the government of Minneapolis was shocked to find out that police are leaving the force in droves.  Even more unexpectedly the crime rate and especially the murder rate have spiked.  The City Council’s reaction was twofold.  First they attributed the spike to President Trump being evil and secondly they ordered police details to provide personal protection for City Council members.  With the problem now fully under control they went back to the main order of business, vilifying the police and President Trump.

But as personally satisfying as that action plan has been for the City Council and Mayor it appears that the residents of Minneapolis are still selfishly complaining about the carjackings, running gun battles between gangs, aggravated assaults and the odd murder here and there.  Why must these people harp on these petty problems?  Can’t they see that every day Minneapolis is getting closer and closer to real racial justice?  Oh, well.

Well anyway back in the real world a coalition of people who live in the effected area are begging the city and state government to send combat troops into the city to end the mayhem.

Reading the article you can sense the desperation in people who see their world disintegrating around them.  But reading the comments after the article it’s split about 50/50 between those who agree and those who think everything is just fine.  Minneapolis is now where New York City was back in the 1960s during the riots.  They can retreat from the madness of blaming the police for street crime or they can watch as the middle class residents leave in droves and leave the city a shell of its former self.  If I were guessing I’d go with white flight and burned out shell.

It will be educational to see how this latest case of the death of an American city plays out.  Who knows, maybe they’ll surprise me and vote to survive instead.  Anything is possible.

A Choice for the Blue State Voters

This election is already decided in the minds of almost every voter in America.  Other than a bloodbath in Portland or some other city where the lunatics of Antifa and BLM are rampaging I don’t think there are any more minds to change in terms of the Presidential vote.  But what about going forward in places like Minnesota, Wisconsin, Oregon, Illinois and New York?  I’d like to say a few things to the poor prisoners living in these states.  Are you happy with the way you’re being treated by the people running your state?  Do you want to send them a message or are you too passive and gutless to hit back at the people who have treated you like cattle for the last nine months?

In these blue-states, governors were complicit with local authorities in allowing rioters to control cities for months on end.  This was simultaneous with these same governors holding the general population under house arrest because of the COVID scam.  What I want to say to you blue state voters is, don’t you want to send a message to these people who have stolen most of a year out of your lives and defaced the streets and businesses of the cities you live and work in?

I’m not expecting you to necessarily vote in Republicans.  It would be reasonable for some moderate Democrat to take advantage of the unpopularity generated by the incumbents to run a primary challenge against these knuckleheads.  But if no challenger appears on the Democrat side it seems to me if you people are self-respecting men you must have pride enough to strike back at the people that allowed these outrages to go on.  Even if you don’t mind having your city held hostage by roving gangs of vandals and looters maybe you’ve grown tired of being lectured and hectored about your supposed white privilege and your responsibility and guilt for things that happened over a hundred and fifty years ago by people that probably have no relation to you whatsoever.

And if you actually have no detectable pride maybe you have some shred of compassion for your own children and grandchildren who will inherit the world that you are allowing your new masters to build.  They will be third class citizens in their own country and they will keep paying the price that you are signing them up for.  Pretty soon the red-states will be separating themselves from these policies and you will be beyond the help of free people.  Neither side will be in a position to coerce the other into following laws they don’t want.  So pretty soon you’ll have to choose.  You can turn your state around and rejoin the world of free speech and equality of opportunity or you can be a prisoner shackled to the wheel of social justice from which there is no reprieve from the life sentence.  You’ll pay your tribute to the gods of diversity and anti-racism knowing full well that no matter how much you pay it will never be enough to remove the Mark of Cain on your forehead and your descendants’ unto the last generation.  If you leave those states too late, you’ll be lucky if they leave you the clothes on your back.  All your stuff will be theirs.  Look at what California is already dreaming up for people who leave, an exit tax.

So, make up your mind, it’s your choice, at least for a little while.

The Pitch

Whether the Republican Party, going forward, continues as the home for the people resisting the Woke Jacobins or some other organization represents them, I think it is necessary that they come up with a simple narrative for why people should vote for them.  Rather than the old “Truth, Justice, and the American Way” I think they’re going to have to rebrand.  In sales there is the concept of “the pitch.”  Basically, it is the salesman’s best guess at what he can say to the buyer to close the sale.  One thing any salesman knows is that the attention span of the customer is extremely short.  What is put forth must be the strongest bit of persuasion possible and it needs to be concise.

For this reason, I believe that it is useless to try and win over the Middle and even parts of the Left by waxing poetic about free speech, free enterprise, free trade or even free college.  Some of it will work with some of them and some will work with others but even if they believe you it won’t get their attention.  All of it has already been said by all the frauds on the Left and the Right a million times already.  It’s just background noise at this point.  This won’t get it done.  And it can’t even be President Trump’s 2016 pitch, “Make America Great Again.”  It’s a great pitch and it made him president.  But it’s limited to the Right.  What we need is something that will work on anyone who isn’t woke.  We need this because the Left has unleashed a monster on the country and it shouldn’t be ignored.  It is both a horrible weapon and also a great gift.  They have dropped the mask and they are allowing the regular people on the Right and the Middle and the Left to really see what they intend for all of us.  This is the equivalent of when the Communists took to the streets in Weimar Germany.  It was their endgame and they no longer held back about what they intended and what they were willing to do to get it.

By now there is more than enough documentary evidence available from Minneapolis, Kenosha, Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Atlanta, St. Louis and New York.  Packaging it into commercials and posters is child’s play for the campaign teams that the political parties have at their disposal.  All it requires is the slogan needed to sell the voters and convince them that it is in their interest to buy the product, to vote for the program.

Succinctly put, I think it would be something like this, “We are the only ones who can save you and your children from being eaten alive by BLM and Antifa.”  Some might object to “eaten alive.”  Maybe that seems inaccurate.  Sure, I’m a bit on the poetic side.  Say rather, “We are the only ones who can save you and your children from being beaten, robbed and dispossessed by BLM and Antifa.”  Either way I think that is the gist of the pitch.  Forget about freedom, forget about economics.  Stick to the fear of being fed to the howling mob.  I’ve never been in advertising but I was a salesman and I know that the two most powerful emotions that can be invoked in a pitch are greed and fear.  In this pitch, greed doesn’t come into play.  But fear is front and center on this one.  There are videos of the mob smashing, looting and burning down people’s businesses.  We have scenes of them beating and even killing innocent people who didn’t flee from their onslaught.

Basically, if the Republicans truly are too stupid to take advantage of this opportunity then they must simply be replaced by those who aren’t.  The Mid-West is full of Democrat voters who can be convinced that it is in their best interests to stop the madness that is being inflicted upon their neighbors every night on their television screens.

For the people listening the message should be forget the tri-corner hats, stock up on ammunition.

How Much Weirder Will It Get?

We are living in a time that, with respect to weirdness, rivals anything in living memory.  We have whole areas of the country that are not only tolerating but actually abetting a violent insurrection on their own soil.  We have the intelligentsia and the various other elite groupings of the country almost monolithically backing an attempt to unseat a legitimately elected President of the United States by illegal actions of the Justice Department and Intelligence agencies of the Federal government.  And finally, we have a bioweapon unleashed by the Chinese and allowed by the Democrat controlled states to disrupt the life and economy of the country right before a presidential election.  All that’s missing is an eruption of walking dead stalking the countryside in search of fresh brains or a flying saucer invasion or an infestation of elephant sized giant ants in the sewers of Portland Oregon.  Scratch that last one.  No one would notice or care if Portland was wiped out by giant ants.  It would be an improvement.

There is a theory that right after the election is decided the rioting will stop and even the COVID hysteria will end.  Depending on the theorist this will or won’t depend on who wins.  Some speculate that if President Trump wins that the rebellion will continue and maybe even increase.  Others say that it ends no matter who wins.

I’m not sure who’s right.  I do know that the radicals have become completely unhinged.  I’m not sure they will disappear if the Democrats take over.  In fact, I think they will become the shock troops to reinforce whatever unconstitutional actions the Democrats proclaim.  If the President wins, he may be faced with this unending street violence into the foreseeable future.  Up till now he has barely intervened in places like Portland and Seattle.  But after the election it doesn’t seem possible that the status quo can continue.  And I’m sure the President wants to end this chaotic disruption of the peace.

So, this is what I think will be after the election.  If the President is re-elected, he has to crush the rebellion.  The correct way this should happen is for the FBI to gather up the ringleaders and prosecute them and those that funded and organized them.  If William Barr is slow to do this then he will have to be replaced.  And it seems we will know almost immediately if this will be necessary.  Barr has failed to prosecute the conspirators of the Coup against the President.  If after the President is re-elected Barr fails to act then he must be immediately dismissed and replaced with someone willing to clean out the Justice Department from top to bottom.  And this new Attorney General will also need to crush Antifa and BLM completely.  And I judge that this can be accomplished, if not easily, then at least after some diligence.

But if Biden wins the White House then the red states are going to have to take action against these groups inside their cities.  Places like Austin, Texas and Atlanta, Georgia will need to be cleaned out by the state governments.  This will be made all the more difficult by the interference that the Justice Department and its components like the FBI will perpetrate in support of the terrorists.  And I further believe that once the federal government is in friendly hands, these terrorist groups will unleash chaos on an even grander scale.  They will issue out of the cities and terrorize the suburbs and countryside.  It may be that this will be the spark that finally starts a counterrevolution.  But it will be mess.

These are my guesses as to what awaits us after the election.  Obviously, I prefer that a second Trump Administration will be the instrument of destruction for the Antifa and BLM vermin.  But either way, I think it is long past time that these anarchists are dragged away and put in prison where they truly belong.  Let’s hope that our leaders have the backbone to get it done.

Jason Whitlock Gives Me Hope for this Country

Jason Whitlock is an African American and a sports writer who loves basketball.  But he loves his country more than any sports team and certainly more than any athlete.  His article cuts right to the heart of what is wrong with the NBA and the rest of professional sports.  Read it.  It’s good.

Whitlock: USA or NBA? That is An Easy Choice For Me

Jason Whitlock over at OutKick Speaks the Hard Truth About Antifa and BLM

Jason Whitlock is a black sports writer.  He’s gone on his own after working for FoxNews and I think ESPN.  He says what he thinks and doesn’t care about sacred cows of any color.  He’s saved me a buch of time talking about the debate and what was covered up about the riots.  Jason has some good insights.  And he’s unafraid of the outrage he causes.  Good for him.

Chris Wallace, American Media Fiddle During Debate As BLM, Antifa Burn Our Country

 

 

 

29SEP2020 – First Presidential Debate – A Review

The first thing that should be said is that even though Chris Wallace is a lefty creep, he is probably going to be the least offensive of the moderators we can expect during the rest of the debates.  The ones going forward will probably be women from NPR and CNN that will whine and screech about every woman’s issue imaginable.

The format was supposed to be six segments with sometimes more than one question in each segment.  Each candidate was supposed to get two minutes without interruption to answer the question.  Well that didn’t happen.  The President interrupted early and he interrupted often.  But to be fair the lies that Biden was telling deserved to be refuted.  And several of the topics were slanted obviously against the President.

The questions that I remember were about:

  • The Supreme Court Pick
  • COVID
  • The Economy
  • Black Voters
  • Law and Order
  • President Trump’s Tax Returns
  • Climate Change
  • The President’s Ending of Anti-American Indoctrination in the American Government Offices
  • Mail-In Ballots

I would say that the President got the best of the arguments about The Supreme Court Pick, Black Voters, Law and Order, Tax Returns, Climate Change, Anti-American Indoctrination and Mail-In Ballots.  But that leaves COVID and the Economy that weren’t as clear cut.  Biden hammered away at COVID with all he had.  President Trump made his case but that round was more like a tie.  And since that’s a very important issue that needs to be improved on in the next debate.  On the economy both Biden and Wallace exaggerated the economic situation at the end of the Obama administration.  And Biden downplayed how well the economy has recovered after the initial COVID shutdown.  I want to give the President a slight edge on the Economy segment.  So overall I’ll say President Trump won the debate.  And above and beyond the stated topics, the President was able to raise the question of the culpability of Obama and Biden in the Russia-gate scandal and he hammered Biden on Hunter Biden’s activities in the Ukraine and China.

On a personal note I find it nauseating that the moderators still slant the whole proceeding clearly to the Left.  It’s good to see the President stood up for himself and zinged Biden left and right.  Some of my favorite moments were:

  • When Biden said the President was unintelligent and President Trump came back and said that Biden was at the bottom of his class in college and lately couldn’t even remember the name of the town, he was in.
  • When Biden criticized President Trump’s large rallies, the President mocked him saying the Biden rallies typically had about three people attending because no one wanted to attend something so boring.

So, to sum up what I saw:

  • Biden has to be credited with not being brain dead.  Whether chemically enhanced or just reinvigorated he only looked frail not demented.
  • The President vigorously defended himself on all fronts and jabbed Biden on all his weak points.
  • The moderators are going to be nakedly biased for Biden in their questions and their attitudes.
  • The President is going to have to come up with a more coherent COVID story that attacks the Dems for their linkage to China, their ineffective handling of protecting the elderly in the states they govern and the damage their extended lockdowns are doing to people and the economy.

Guest Contributor – The Fat Man – Antifa, Sci Fi, The Bomb, Consumerism and The Death of Innovation – Part 3

Some Evidence

Some case studies of innovation begin with a scientific advance such as the identification of the photoelectric effect or other quantum phenomenon and traces its application to an invention dependent on that advance such as the laser. Other descriptions are more ethnographic, observing an industrial ecosystem, then focusing in on its niche like the Connecticut River Valley manufacturing industry of the 18th century and its development of interchangeable gun parts. More quantitative accounts begin with economic dynamics by measuring the role of capital, labor and then try to show excess growth attributed to changes in technology processes or investment.

All of these approaches seek to account for growth not related to easily measurable factors by looking at newly discovered insights or newly introduced technologies that confer some advantage to an offering competing in a market. Many of these accounts are useful in documenting the precedent conditions to productive change. They have been reduced to a list in many papers and articles on innovation and economic growth. They include access to basic research and related intellectual property, capital, talent, geographic or virtual proximity and so on. Other less concrete factors are also named such as entrepreneurism, leadership or vision. This body of literature is rapidly growing but the more that is written about innovation and the greater the attempts to reduce it to an economic model, the further the goal seems to move. The sudden drop in the total factor productivity in the US after the 1970s seems less understood the more that is written about it. Commentators, whether economist or philosophers, business leaders or politicians, have moved from qualitative analysis to social pleading yet offer no reliable, let alone predictable, hypothesis.

To some, the loss of American vitality is seen as an emergency, a surrendering or dissipation of the most valuable trend in human history. The loss of a cultural and economic heritage that transformed the world from a brutal place to a prosperous one. To others the change was the inevitable correction as resources were redistributed by political systems evolving away from their imperial structures of exploitation. Why do some students and proponents of innovation see it as somehow related to culture? Why do discussions of innovation seem to invite political explanations? At any level of analysis, it would seem innovation has almost nothing to do with politics and philosophy, rather a question of science, economics, and commerce. It is true that politics influence and at times determines investment in science and seek to manage economies, if not specific markets, but does that mean we can find the source of innovation in political processes?

The issue of what changed that precipitated the reduction in growth of the US economy and, apparently, innovation has a stock list of suspects. Government regulation is a commonly cited culprit. In the case of nuclear energy this seems irrefutable. Corporatism is another clear candidate. Anyone who carefully analyzes big company structures and processes, from their silo functions to their anti-competitive strategies and general slow-footedness knows that the landscape of a shrinking number of large companies dominating legacy industries can only be poison to innovation. It is hard to consider these and other familiar hypotheses that purport to account for the decrease in innovation, such as failed schools, family breakdown and the loss of faith, without turning away from the question in despair, even horror.

Perhaps it is better to start with a more direct examination of innovation in the past versus today. For example, the slowing of progress in individual transportation in the last fifty years. Why don’t cars fly? It is harder to make a car fly than roll so innovation today won’t look like innovation a century ago. This is the low hanging fruit explanation, flying is harder, but what does that mean? Well, making a car fly is not an incremental change from progressively making cars roll faster and more efficiently. In fact, making a car fly may not be an innovation at all. Innovation is not the invention of new things for their own sake. Innovation solves replication problems. What replication problem does a flying car solve? How much faster does individual transportation need to move over the earth’s surface than a mile a minute? And, for that matter, how much faster than a mile a second does flight need to achieve? The low hanging fruit explanation does seem to touch on something useful, but not in the ordinary sense of the barrier of increasing complexity. It also points to the question of need.

Commentators point to aging American cities with their 19th century subways and mid-20th century skyscrapers as evidence of our decline. (We might observe, as an aside, that no one ever complains about the age of buildings in Rome or Paris) They point to slower travel times, increasing real energy costs and shortening life expectancies in the same breath to demonstrate the drop in the pace of innovation. These seem alarming symptoms of our loss of progress. But are they really? How high does a building need to rise? How often should they be replaced? How many millions should a city accommodate? Subways certainly age, need to be maintained and improved, but should a civilization’s innovative energies be focused on subways? Surely this is not a problem of complexity, nor was the decision to abandon supersonic transport. These are choices that have little to do with innovation as normally discussed.

It is clear that in the postwar period, in different forms in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and the rest of the developed world, much of these societies’ productive energy was focused on “social progress”. Some would call much of it, the changing role of women, concern for the environment, other post-imperial transitions like industrial nationalization and the rise of the welfare state, social engineering that at least in name might be considered innovation. These large reallocations of resources and dislocations of existing social structures undoubtedly had equally large effects on the focus of our productive energies, if not to derail them. For much of the industrial world social progress represented a deliberate regression away from the culture of Manhattan Projects and moon shots. Social progress led not to building more advanced cities but housing projects for the poor, which, in turn, led many to leave cities altogether. In America, the suburban “innovation”, born of the federal interstate highway program, made things cheaper, more convenient at first, and increased standards of living substantially for at least two decades. But it did not just increase the marginal quality of upper middle-class family existence by eventually sending most women into the workforce and expanded the average size of a suburban house and the number of cars in their driveways.  Living standards per capita measured in occupied square feet, miles driven, cost per student, ballooned in the 1970’s and 1980’s until even lower middle-class families living outside of cities occupied larger houses, drove further and spent more per student on education, even consumed more calories, than their counterparts in any other society. Was this not productive change?

Many would say no. Those social and economic changes may have been desired after the two wars and the prospect of global extinction, but they did not yield what innovation always does. Doing more with less, rather the opposite. Reallocation and baby booms might be products of innovation, but they do not bring it about. But the social and material changes in family structure and standards of living do suggest an answer to our question of why building and subway construction have not advanced. They didn’t need to, certainly not with the suburbanization of society and the massive expansion car culture.

There are parallels of this redirection of innovation in energy, in air transportation, even in medicine. A central concept to the development of new medical therapies is the idea of “unmet need”. Still at the dawn of the 20th century most people in the world died of gastric perforation. This mortality was directly tied to waterborne infections and contaminants so the unmet medical need for gastric disease was very high in the year 1900. Epidemiology showed not just mortality, but morbidity, other suffering than death such as poor nourishment, pain, and loss of work, were also caused by digestive disease. At first, slowly through the improvement of urban waste management and water treatment, and then more quickly after World War II through development of a series of pharmacotherapies such as antibiotics, then H-2 antagonists, PPI’s and finally triple antibiotic therapies, the medical unmet need for upper gastric disorders has largely been addressed.

This does not mean that no one suffers an upset stomach anymore. Prosperity and the overabundance of calories ensure that people still need digestive therapies. But as a public health priority, upper digestive disease has fallen from top to bottom. This is reflected in the demand for infrastructure professionals and new upper digestive pharmacotherapies that address digestive disease. Public engineering in the first half of the 20th century in America was a leading professional undertaking as the nation built its cities to postwar capacity. Those same H-2 antagonists and PPIs were the world’s largest selling and most lucrative drugs to treat aging patients born while H. Pylori, a water born pathogen, was prevalent. Today large-scale hydro-engineering projects occur at a small fraction of their former frequency and the gross sales of gastric pharmacotherapies and the innovative creation of new ones are comparatively tiny and few.

Is the contraction of PPI markets and the reduction of sewer treatment projects evidence of an innovation crisis or reduction in unmet need? Why has subway and high-rise construction investment fallen? In the 1920s as the New York City subway system was completed and was the envy of the world, the city had between 8 and 9 million residents that paid a billion fares per year. Those numbers are still largely the same today. Before the completion of most high-rise housing, New York City reached its steady state of population. By the 1970s and during the decades of the decline in US total factor productivity, national firms and their employees were abandoning New York City, raising vacancy rates. So why build and innovate more subways, buildings and their associated technologies? What was the unmet need? The answer is, there was none.

The only objection raised by these facts, that even the poor in the West have excessive basic resources in calories, in utilization of individual transport, spending on education and housing space, is that people are still poor and life for many is grim. But is this a problem of innovation, of productive growth? Would making energy free, as once imagined, or food free, as it nearly is in terms of minimum daily calories, make life less grim? The answer is no, with the sole exception of the extremely poor, defined by the World Bank as less than $1 dollar-a-day of income, a vanishingly small population in the US and one not attributable to jobless or homeless conditions but mental illness and drug addiction. There is no evidence that more square feet or more individual driving or more spending on education will meaningfully reduce the true unmet needs of lower income people. It may make car companies, energy companies, landlords and teacher unions richer but greater innovation in individual transportation, education, energy and food production will not reduce unmet needs in these areas because they are already so low. No amount of additional spending above the already impossibly high per student costs to simply teach a first grader to read will improve literacy rates. Even $100,000 per student per year would not improve the reading scores of the urban and rural poor. And if it did, such improvement would not be due to innovation, which we have defined as doing more with less. Rather, by reducing the scarcity of these resources, suburbanization has led to their inflated worthlessness. Cheap goods and services have led to the devaluing of them to the point of laxity. Is reflected in obesity rates, lowering test scores, falling birthrates, which for any other living system of organisms, would rise with expanding resources. That is until their own waste chokes them. This is the cradle of our heroes, The Muppets.

 

End of Part 3

Post Script

Ok, if necessity is actually the mother of innovation, lots of needs have been met in the last 100 years, but why did growth stop, the ASB becomes irrelevant and suburban consumerism take hold and become the millennial Muppet cradle sometime in the nineteen seventies? And what about Frank Sinatra? Stay tuned for Part 4.

Plans for November 3rd and the Days Following

Nota Bene: This is a frivolous post about how I intend to celebrate Election Day this year.  I will provide myself a fig leaf to justify this childishness by also discussing the serious topic of safety from mob violence during these dangerous times.  Fair warning has been served.

If President Trump is declared the winner on Election Day or shortly thereafter, I think it is reasonable for people to anticipate that there could be some serious safety issues in certain areas of the country.  And this is not idle or far-fetched reasoning.  The Left has already mobilized small guerilla bands to lead riots and arson attacks on all the major cities that they control politically.  It is only common sense that they might unleash a spasm of violence and destruction to protest the ultimate repudiation of their political stance.

If you live or work near one of these cities, I think it would be prudent to take certain precautions that week.  First of all be sure to listen to the local news and avoid any areas that have become habitual protest locales.  Figure out what work-arounds you can use to give them a wide berth.  Make sure you don’t have any Trump or Republican messages on your car or your person.  If you work in town but live outside leave early on election night and don’t stick around for any reason.  Postpone any activities in the city until the election madness wears off.

If I were planning ahead for this situation, I would consider calling in sick if you have any doubts at all about the chance of being caught up in a riot or other form of unrest.  Basically, it’s just not worth the risk.  With the whole COVID thing going on and remote work becoming so prevalent, it wouldn’t be difficult to get a day or two out of the office.

As for myself, I’m going to camp out and watch the whole nightmare from start to finish.  It’s become something of a tradition to watch the late state returns into the morning hours and listen to the clueless talking heads trying to justify whatever surprises emerge in the results.  I’m anticipating a Republican wave for the President, the House and the Senate so I’m hoping to end the evening by listening to lefty reporters and celebrities wailing and gnashing their teeth as YouTube fills up with blue haired women screaming and hyperventilating over their rage and despair in a replay of 2016.  In fact, in a couple of weeks I intend to start working on the menu to go with the Election Night party.  I’m thinking earlier on we can go with deli sandwiches, corned beef, pastrami and roast beef.  This will of course require potato salad and some kind of soup, maybe a sausage and bean.  Later on, we’ll go with smaller items, maybe pigs in a blanket with brown mustard.  And at the end of the night I’d say some kind of ice cream course.

And this plan will be in effect regardless of how the election returns or the write-in ballots or the judicial shenanigans play out.  The days when I hung on the edge of my seat worrying how Ohio or Florida or Pennsylvania votes is long gone.  This is all in-the-moment skirmishing that doesn’t settle anything.  We no longer have one nation making up its mind on what it wants its future to be.  We’re just watching two diametrically opposed nations wrestling with each other in a mostly bloodless conflict.  It’s like two men fighting for control of the steering wheel of a moving vehicle.  There’s no clear way for one or the other to take control and at all times the possibility of a fatal crash is highly likely.  We seem to be waiting for one side or the other to declare an end to the charade.

But that doesn’t mean we have to wallow in misery.  Life is to be enjoyed and even in the midst of hatred and insanity we must not miss out on all the things that make it good.  Election Day is in between Halloween and Thanksgiving and I intend to celebrate both those things and even have a little fun on Election Day too.  Live blogging the event is a given.  If we win and can celebrate the despair of our enemies all the better.  If not, then splendiferous foods will have to make up for it.

So, as you can see, I like to turn a negative into an opportunity to enjoy the catastrophe that is heading our way.  But whether you celebrate the election or head to bed early to avoid the stress and strain I am completely serious about taking precautions against some kind of insurrection by the Left.  These people are very angry and a little bit desperate.  They are trying to frighten us and apparently no longer worry about niceties like the law and human decency.  So, stay way out of their way and live to see the better day that we expect to dawn on November 4th when President Trump is re-elected and his new Republican House joins the enlarged Republican Majority in actually doing some legislating for a change.  Like maybe funding the rest of the Wall and ending trade with China.