The Goofiest Barred Owl Bar None

This has been a pretty weird winter weather-wise.  We have had fifty degrees and minus five so far in January.  I’ve had snow, rain, sleet and hurricane force winds all on the same day.  There have been torrential rains followed by bright sun.  Weird.  And now just to show you that I’m not the only one who’s confused our local Barred Owl has switched into a daytime critter.  This bugger was in a tree branch right outside my living room window and scarfing down mice right before my eyes.  Their ability to turn their heads one hundred eighty degrees is pretty bizarre.  But if staying up all day means he won’t be serenading me at two a.m. then count me in on the program.  These Barred Owls have one of the weirder sounding repertories among the “Children of the Night” in my neck of the woods.

I happened to have my camera there but it was equipped with the Sony 55mm f\1.8 lens.  I took a bunch of shots through a double glazed window and here they are cropped and resized out of all sanity.

Barred Owl with mouse; Sony A7 III; Sony 55mm f\1.8 lens

If you look real close you’ll see something hanging from his beak.  In the rest of the shots you’ll understand the whole story

Barred Owl with mouse; Sony A7 III; Sony 55mm f\1.8 lens

 

 

 

Barred Owl with mouse; Sony A7 III; Sony 55mm f\1.8 lens

 

 

 

Barred Owl with mouse; Sony A7 III; Sony 55mm f\1.8 lens

Later on in the day he showed up again and I got outside to try and take some shots with my 200mm macro. The effort was only partially successful but it will be the bulk of my photo of the day efforts for the next few days.  Now what accounts for this nocturnal pest suddenly becoming a diurnal pest is beyond my weak powers of deduction.  Just one more sign of the apocalypse I suppose.

Aesop’s Fable of the Fox, The 600 mm Lens and the Senile Photographer

A fox den was established in the woods next to me in the spring.  Last time I had the 150 – 600 mm Sigma Sport lens I never got a good chance to shoot the male rooting around in our compost pile.  Two weeks ago the parents and now large kits stopped showing up around the area and I assumed I’d lost my chance.  I rented the 150 – 600 mm Sigma Contemporary for my vacation this week to compare it to the Sport.  Today the male fox was spotted a couple of times.  So I set up near the compost pile at 6:30 pm and sure enough he showed up.  The lens behaved well and I took a bunch of shots.  But stupidly I didn’t even notice I was shooting at 150 mm!  I was shooting macro all day with the Sony 90 mm macro and I was completely used to shooting everything in the magnified setting so doing it now felt natural.  Well, the crops are okay, but that’s got to be the most bone-headed and frustrating mistake I’ve made in at least an hour.  But I’m sure to do something stupider soon enough and then I’ll feel better about this one.

 

Southern New England Gray Fox w/ Sony A7 III w/ Sigma 150 – 600 mm Contemporary lens on Sigma MC-11 converter, at 150mm focal length
Southern New England Gray Fox w/ Sony A7 III w/ Sigma 150 – 600 mm Contemporary lens on Sigma MC-11 converter, at 150mm focal length
Southern New England Gray Fox w/ Sony A7 III w/ Sigma 150 – 600 mm Contemporary lens on Sigma MC-11 converter, at 150mm focal length
Southern New England Gray Fox w/ Sony A7 III w/ Sigma 150 – 600 mm Contemporary lens on Sigma MC-11 converter, at 150mm focal length
Southern New England Gray Fox w/ Sony A7 III w/ Sigma 150 – 600 mm Contemporary lens on Sigma MC-11 converter, at 150mm focal length