Bronze Age Mindset – A Book Review

When Bronze Age Mindset (BAM) came out last year I heard a little bit about it at various sites.  When Michael Anton reviewed the book back in August I became interested and decided to read it.  When the author (Bronze Age Pervert or BAP for short)  published a response to Anton in October I reminded myself to buy it.  Now I’ve read it and I am trying to get my opinion into some kind of an orderly form.  But unfortunately, BAM isn’t that kind of a work.  It’s a mixture of philosophical treatise, civilizational diatribe, atavistic lament and fraternal advice.  One thing is for sure.  BAP wants this world to melt down hard enough so that he can securely raise the black flag and start slitting throats.

As has been noted previously by Anton, BAP is in at least part agreement with Nietzsche.  BAP reviles our age for its complete lack of heroic opportunities.  He believes that for at least a portion of modern men life in a modern democratic state is a death sentence.  A large part of the first part of the book describes his comparison of modern life to the life of the warriors of Bronze Age Greece as embodied in the Homeric works and the military dictatorship in Sparta.  Along the way he expends enormous vitriol decrying the modern world and its feminists, neutered males (bugmen), endless bureaucracy, politically correct institutions, slave-driving lifestyles and the generic ugliness of modern life.  He despises democracy as a false equivalency.  He believes in the superiority of the alpha male and his right to rule over the rest of society.

BAP writes this diatribe in a clipped version of English that uses internet abbreviations and leaves out definite and indefinite articles at random.  This doesn’t make it too difficult to read along but to my ear it is affected.  Toward the end of the book he lapses into grammatical English and is obviously very literate.

As for the pervert in his name (BAP), he does seem to espouse at least some kind of homoerotic sensibility but he seems to describe it as not a homosexual attraction but an appreciation of male physical perfection.  Either way for me it’s off-putting.  Also, he thinks that the seamiest parts of the underworld with its pornography and prostitution and other perversions is important and men like him are meant to delve into it and take possession of it for some redemptive purpose that involves destroying the bugmen order.

The book is uneven and ranges from poetic to almost psychotic.  Some of it is either humorous fantasy or the author believes in things that are obviously untrue.  For instance, he claims that Laotian is the same language as the dialect of Spanish spoken in Chiapas Mexico.

Toward the end of the book he talks more realistically about what a non-bugman can do to exist in the nightmarish post-normal world we find ourselves in.  Here he is addressing the non-pirate, non-superman part of the population that have jobs and families.  Some of the advice is actually very sensible and useful.

All in all, I found the book interesting.  He has some insights that even a normie such as myself finds resonant.  Undoubtedly the book is uneven and at times bizarre but it has valid points to make and it speaks to a part of every normal man who finds himself marooned in the modern Hive and wonders how we got here and how we get out.  It’s not for all tastes but if you’re interested in another take on the modern world this might be interesting to you.

 

 

 

FISA Court Veteran Opines on the IG ‘s Report

Francey Hakes, a former assistant U.S. attorney weighs in on the seriousness and the likelihood that abuse of power was involved in the FISA warrants used against the Trump campaign figures.  She has experience with the process having herself appeared before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court during her career, presenting applications for counterterrorism and counterespionage warrants on a special detail to the Department of Justice Office of Intelligence Policy and Review.

Take a look.

Guest Contributor – The Fat Man – Movie Review – A History of Violence – David Cronenberg

I thought sci-fi fans might get a kick out of a review of this film since its source was a graphic novel and its director is David Cronenberg, who I rank with Kubrick as among the most important directors working in the genre.

The movie has a quality cast, including Viggo Mortensen as the rural Indiana restaurateur, Tom Stall; Maria Bello as his wife Edie; Ed Harris as the gangster Carl Fogarty; Ashton Holmes as Jack Stall, Tom’s son; and William Hurt as Tom’s kingpin brother from Philly. There are also a host of additional small-role actors that do an excellent job. Harris is particularly effective as the one-dimensional killer as is Holmes as the nerdy millennial.

The movie opens by following two motel guests, one in a dark button-down shirt in the middle of the desert, i.e. a bad guy, packing up to “head east” and “avoid the big cities”. The younger partner complains of the boredom and yawns his way through the rest of the scene, including when he’s asked to go back to the front desk and fetch water from the cooler for the long drive.  There he sleepily encounters the clerk and maid whose throats his partner has just slit and almost nods out as he notices that a small child is emerging from the back room and shoots her. Like I said, bad guys.

This lovely bit of business is immediately contrasted by Tom and his quiet nuclear family. In these introductory scenes of the Stalls they all speak so softly and behave so tenderly to one another that the opening scene becomes submerged by the normal impulse to separate this seemingly vulnerable family from the monsters. But we know they will come and the savagery of the two drifters is anticipated by the inevitable high school bully that humiliates Jack in gym for daring to catch a fly ball to right. Violence, large and small, is almost clumsily emphasized. Cronenberg was said to have commented in connection to the film, “I am a great believer in Darwinian evolution and that violence is baked into our genes”, presumably explaining his lack of subtly on the issue.

When I read his comment, I thought of Cronenberg’s other films, like “Dead Ringers”, the story of twin gynecologists that descended into a surgical horror. And other of his films, Naked Lunch, Crash, Fly, all disturbing, but not particularly violent in any conventional sense. Rather, at their core, his films stylize death and disfigurement in a kind of grotesque eroticism. His focus, until “History”, was more in line with Poe than Peckinpah. Afterwards, however, gangsters and violence become common in his movies. One suspects the shift may be understood at least in part as commercial, but also, he seems to be trying to work out more conventional themes in more mature ways. For instance, “History” includes Bello in a frontal nude scene that seemed all too blue-blooded for the director of Naked Lunch.

In any event, when a very fickle fate sends our drifters into Tom’s diner, we are shown all the good that violence can do. For just as blue shirt instructs his youthful partner drooling at the waitress to “start on her”, mild mannered Tom dispenses with the would-be butchers faster than you can flip a flapjack. His ruthless efficiency at smashing a hot coffee pot in the face of one assailant, retrieving his gun and then dispatching both make his adversaries seem like amateurs. Even professionals like Ed Harris’ Carl and his gang can’t measure up to Tom’s lethal skill set. Carl, hearing of Tom’s heroics on the news, emerges from Tom’s past as if vomited out of hell’s mouth.  His face seems half melted, one eye is clouded, he claims his visage is a reflection of Tom’s true nature and he has come to return him to it.

I won’t belabor the obvious. I’m sure the reader knows there is only one way our genes and destiny can resolve such a history. It’s a pretty good film, especially given its source. “A History of Violence” made money and won acclaim but it was less influential than one might have guessed back in 2005. When I saw it back then, I thought that some of the film’s hokier elements like the straw man bullies and one-dimensional housewives would evolve along with the genre. I was wrong, in fact, the thinnest parts of graphic novel sources like Watchmen or Westworld, the robot/costume stuff, became the focus of their realization on the screen. We have devolved, but I’m sure that statement comes as no surprise.

 

 

 

ShatnerKhan 1 – Part 4 – Conclusion

After reviving ourselves again with refreshments we estimated that we had time for one last course before exhaustion would set in.  Almost at random we selected Mudd’s Women.  It was a mistake.  What we thought we were going to watch was the episode called I, Mudd.  This one is about Mudd selling women that he artificially beautifies with a drug.  It’s boring and meaningless. At the end the women are seen to be beautiful without the drug because they’re self-confident.  Yeah sure, and I’m Brad Pitt.

Anyway, this poor episode angered the delegates and disrupted the complacency that the massive junk food binge had produced.  We set to work repairing the situation with mass quantities of supplies.  Once we had re-established our equilibrium, we decided to quickly bring the ShatnerKhan to a rapid close.  But we did ramble on about what we had learned and vowed less poisonous food at ShatnerKhan 2.

So, what did we learn?

  • William Shatner is indeed a demigod of bad acting. Series television, made-for-tv movies, big studio major motion pictures, even minor awards ceremonies; none of them are proof against his patented lousy acting skills.  He is a ham for all seasons.
  • As lousy an actor as Shatner is, he is definitively the best part of the original Star Trek series. His character possesses almost the only heroic characteristics to be found on the show.  The rest of them are even bigger weirdos and losers than he is.
  • Shatner actually seems to be a decent comic actor. He is able to perform self-deprecating routines quite skillfully.  We decided not to hold this against him.
  • Much more study will be needed and a much higher grade of food supplies will be needed for future ShatnerKhan events. I personally advocated for deli, others spoke of Thai food and barbecue.  These questions will be sorted out in committee.

But all agreed that ShatnerKhan 1 was a roaring success both academically and gastronomically.

All hail William Shatner, long may you endure as a shining beacon of terrible acting.

 

ShatnerKhan 1 – Part 1