The Day After Chauvin

Yesterday I found the news so depressing that I wasn’t in the mood to write.  It’s hard to paint what happened in the Chauvin trial in anything but the blackest terms.  It was not unexpected but the reality of it brought home just how far we’ve fallen from the days of even our fathers.

But some good comes of even the most painful events.  The primary good will be that black crime will go essentially unchecked in all the Democrat controlled jurisdictions.  No policeman is going to arrest a black man for any reason whatsoever.  Why would he?  If the criminal steals a pair of sneakers or a diamond ring subduing him is a dangerous threat to his own life.  And if he injures the criminal he’ll be prosecuted.  If the black criminal kills someone, the correct procedure is put up the crime scene tape around the body and call the CSI team to take fingerprints and DNA evidence that can be recorded and stored away to prove that a good job was done.  And as for drug crimes, please don’t make me laugh.  Drugs are the solution.  Once the whole population is completely dosed there will be a lot less complaining about crime.  So, the Democrats will have effectively eliminated law enforcement

And that will be a very educational development.  Granted, it will cause incredible misery.  And that will be true in both the black neighborhoods and the other areas.  The knock-on effects will be white (and yellow and brown) flight from the cities and even the inner suburbs by everyone who can.  It will also polarize all the other ethnicities against the black population.  Basically, people will be reacting to the reality of a population that no longer is subject to law enforcement.  Even the Hispanic areas will be aware that there will no longer be a break on the kind of inner-city violence that was held in check by the police.

Dementia Joe plans to try to expand this to the red states by using the Justice Department as a weapon to attack any city that tries to use law enforcement to control crime perpetrated by black criminals.  It will be interesting to see if the red state governors are smart and strong enough to prevent this maneuver.  I know that Ron DeSantis in Florida has put together an anti-rioting law that will allow his state to fight back if a local mayor tries to create a BLM riot situation.

But I expect that places like Atlanta and St. Louis will explode this summer and the feds will do their best to punish the police departments in those cities.  I expect that we’ll see the white cops in all these cities retiring at a pretty good clip.  As I said before I’d be really gratified if one of these BLM parties gets out of control and burns down one of the cities before they realize what they are doing.  Minneapolis or Portland would be my obvious favorites but New York or Chicago would also be great.  We’ll see.

So, I’ve gotten over my discouragement.  I’ve begun looking at what I’ll have to do to move in the future and I spend all my time concentrating on the things and the people that are important to me and only use whatever time is necessary to make sure I avoid all the evil and stupid people that are currently in charge of the former United States of America.  But one thing is sure.  They can stop playing the National Anthem in the Blue States.  In places like Minneapolis, “The Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave,” is just a hollow joke.

The Chauvin Trial – Some Thoughts

Many years ago, I served on a jury for the trial of a man who was accused by his ex-wife of threatening to kill her.  Now this is a serious felony that can land you in prison for a number of years.  The prosecution produced the wife and she testified that after her two-year-old daughter returned from her weekly stay with her father the daughter told her that her ex-husband told the daughter that he was going to kill the ex-wife.  She claimed that the daughter drew her finger across her neck to indicate that he planned to kill her.  The only other witness was the two-year-old daughter.  The tiny child was placed on the witness stand and as soon as the prosecutor approached the stand the child burst out crying hysterically.  After a while, the jury was taken out of the courtroom to a conference room down the hall and waited.  After about a half hour we returned to the jury box and the little girl was brought back to the witness stand and as soon as the prosecutor neared the stand, the little girl once again burst out crying.  The whole process was repeated again and with the same result.  After a third attempt the little girl was excused and was taken from the courtroom.  While all of this was going on I watched the child’s parents.  Her mother was cajoling her from the seat in the front where she was sitting to stop crying and talk to the prosecutor.  Her father, the defendant, looked visibly shaken by the spectacle and during the third attempt there were tears in his eyes.  The defendant was Hispanic and the ex-wife was a blonde who might have been Irish-American.

When we were brought back into the courtroom after the third failure the two lawyers made their closing remarks.  We were given three different charges of lessening severity that the defendant could be charged with.  The defense counsel stressed that the wife’s statement had not been corroborated by any other evidence and that a reasonable doubt was all that was needed to conclude that not guilty was the correct verdict.

The jury was made up of eight women and four men.  We ranged in age from our thirties to forties.  About half were dressed in business attire and the others more casually.  One of the women was made foreman and we had some discussions.  The woman given the lead thought that since we didn’t have much evidence, we should just assign a guilty verdict to the charge that was intermediate in severity and call it a day.  And much to my surprise every other person in that room but myself agreed.  They were perfectly willing to give the defendant a guilty verdict on a crime that could give him five years in prison.  For a minute I was shocked.  When it was my turn to talk, I said, “That’s crazy.  If you have any reasonable doubt of his guilt you are compelled to vote not guilty.”  The answer the foreman gave me was, “Well, he’s probably guilty of something so we won’t be far off with the five-year charge.”  I wanted to say some pretty horrible things to her but instead I just said, “If that was you in there would you want us to just give you five years in prison just in case you were guilty?”  She just grimaced at me and said we should write out our votes.

The first vote was eleven to one.  We called for the court officer and told him the vote.  He said we would have to spend a couple of more hours and try to reach a decision.  We talked some more but no one changed his vote.  We had three more vote and they were all exactly the same.

After two hours the judge came into the jury room and told us he wasn’t surprised that we couldn’t come up with a verdict.  He said it was very unusual to try to get a witness that young into court.  Also, he let us know, now that the trial was finished by a hung jury, that there was a custody battle going on for the child and it was not unusual for spurious complaints to be filed against an ex-spouse to strengthen a custody case.

The point I am making here is that it isn’t likely that most of the jurors will follow the correct procedure for determining guilt.  What Derek Chauvin is down to hoping is that at least one honest man is on that jury.  And I don’t think his chances are very good.  Minnesota is much like New England and most of the inhabitants are very strong adherents of the civic religion that is known as social justice.  They will think it is their duty to heal the racial divide by punishing the scape-goat and that is what Derek Chauvin has been designated.

My guess is they will select the middle severity charge and declare him guilty.  So that is the current state of race relations and justice in the Blue States.  If Chauvin is found guilty of murder I would expect a huge exodus from the police departments across all of the blue states and the blue cities in the red states.  After all, is a dangerous civil service job that pays pretty well worth the chance of spending twenty years in prison?  I’d say no.  Good luck Derek Chauvin, you’ll need it.